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Hip and Groin Injuries
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Hip & Groin Injuries: Prevention and Treatment

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“It’s the best concise reference I know for athletes, coaches, physiotherapists, biokineticists, and other care professionals.

Because it contains everything you need to know about these common and debilitating sports injuries… quick recovery techniques… how to avoid repeat injuries… and what you can do to avoid injury in the first place."

If you take part in dynamic sports – like rugby, football, gymnastics, tennis and golf, even triple jump – then you’ll know exactly how frustrating a hip or groin injury can be.

Even if you haven’t suffered these injuries yourself – you’ll almost certainly have witnessed the frustration of others. And you’ll know how easily hip and groin injuries can ruin a player’s entire season, especially if the root cause is not identified and properly treated. Not only that, but there are a whole host of hamstring-related and lower back injuries that are likely to follow if fundamental changes are not taken to address whatever posture, muscular and other weaknesses are underlying the injury.

Because these sports injuries are so common, our latest Peak Performance Special Report should prove particularly popular to coaches, team managers, care professionals and players alike.

Hip and Groin Injuries: prevention and treatment offers specific and practical resources (injury tests, fitness tests, musculature consequences and more) to address the whole problem of hip and groin injury – and how to attain long term balance and athletic function.

In it you’ll learn what are the most common causes of these injuries, how to treat them successfully – first time, so you can get back to playing sport without a frustratingly long layoff. And, last but by no means least, how best to strengthen and condition an athlete’s body so as to avoid such injuries in the first place.

NB: hip and groin injuries may be common, but that doesn’t mean you should have to suffer them – or why they should have to ruin your whole season. Not if you have access to the right information on sports injury prevention and cure…

As a member of Peak Performance online you’re invited to buyy our copy today at an exclusive discount price – but for a LIMITED time only.

(More details on how to get your copy below.)

First let me tell you a bit about the six expert sports medicine professionals who contributed to the report for us. Because each of them was specially chosen for their first-hand therapeutic experience in this area:

  • Lotty Skinner is the Clinical Director at Full Fitness Sports Injury Clinic – and a regular contributor to the Sports Injury Bulletin specialist newsletter.
  • Scott Smith is an Australian physiotherapist. He works at Albany Creek Sports Injury Clinic in Brisbane, specialising in running and golf injuries. He is currently working with Australian Rules football teams in Brisbane.
  • Chris Mallac has been Head of Sports Med at Bath Rugby and Head Physio at Queensland Reds Super 14. He is currently in private practice in Brisbane, Australia.
  • Elizabeth Ashby is a clinical and research fellow at UCL Hospital with a special interest in outcome studies.
  • Fares Haddad BSc MCh (Orth) FRCS (Orth) is a consultant orthopaedic surgeon at University College London Hospital, and editorial consultant to Sports Injury Bulletin.
  • Ulrik Larsen is an APA sports physiotherapist, Practice Principal with Optima Sports Medicine in Brisbane, Australia and the founder of “Rehab Trainer”.

The collective wisdom of these six specialist contributors – all of them are highly experienced care professionals working with elite athletes across a range of different sports – adds up to several hundred dollars worth of therapeutic advice and input.

And today it’s available to you for a tiny fraction of its real value.

You can be sure their advice is informed, up-to-date – and highly pertinent to anyone seeking to prevent injury, rehabilitate athletes, or prevent the recurrence of injury.

So buy your copy of Hip and Groin Injuries: prevention and treatment TODAY, at our special, 42%-discount.

Whether you’re a coach, manager, care professional or athlete, you’ll find that Hip and Groin Injuries: prevention and treatment is packed with plenty of useful, actionable information.

Answers to such key injury-related issues as:

  • why it’s such a mistake to overlook the hip when considering core stability training
  • what’s the best way to self-treat the troublesome psoas muscle hip flexor?
  • could hip-muscle Imbalances be the cause of your athletes’ frequent back and hamstring troubles?
  • do you know the right way to deal with acetabular labrum tears?
  • what are the most effective strategies for groin pain treatment and rehabilitation?
  • rehabilitating the Gluteus Medius: a new perspective on an established topic
  • what are the most effective muscle conditioning exercises for avoiding hip and groin injury?

What’s more, postage & packing is free. And you’ve got 30 days in the convenience of your own home or sports club to decide whether or not you want to keep the book or return it for a full refund.

Click here to go to our special, discount offer. Or read on to learn more about Hip and Groin Injuries: prevention and treatment

Muscle Imbalances and Sports Injury: why it’s such a mistake to overlook the hip when considering core stability training

Most Stand-alone hip problems are straightforward.

But it is important to remember that the hip joint can also be just one part of a bigger puzzle in a complex lower limb problem, as its functioning has such important consequences both for the lumbo-sacral region and for the knee and ankle.

That’s because the hip joint is usually very mobile, having to withstand both direct loading stresses and large rotational forces with weight-bearing activities. Which makes it especially vulnerable to injury in sports that involve pivoting or twisting movements, such as soccer, Australian Rules football, tennis and golf.

So in the first section of Hip and Groin Injuries: prevention and treatment we zoom in on the movement pathology of the hips – particularly with reference to the likely consequences that particular posture types will have on the associated muscles of the hip.

The discussion focuses in detail on two movement pathologies – then provides a series of self-help exercises for their effective treatment.

  • The first type of problem – and the easier to treat – is when the hip joint has restricted motion. This can produce local hip pain or cause dysfunction in the lumbar spine/sacroiliac joint or the knee, as a result of these structures attempting to compensate for the lack of movement at the hip joint.
  • The second type of problem is where the hip joint has an increased amount of movement arising from a lack of control of the femoral head (top of the thigh bone) in the hip socket; you will often feel or hear clicking or clunking, or a feeling of weakness in the region. A failure to correct this lack of control can lead to joint damage and subsequent long-term restriction of movement.

If only it were so simple that we could split the problem into one or other type of dysfunction. However in reality it will often be a combination of the two.

In the discussion we describe two techniques designed to help improve hip flexion and adduction. The chapter also includes two practical, highly-informative tables relating to muscle length and types – as well as several illustrations of simple exercises designed to resolve muscle imbalances.

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Hip-Muscle Imbalances: could these be the cause of your athletes’ frequent back and hamstring troubles?

Because hip-muscle inbalances are so often a contributory cause of sports injury, we take a close look at this issue in the next section of Hip and Groin Injuries: prevention and treatment.

Muscle imbalance is related to two changes in muscle function: (1) a tightening of a “mobiliser” muscle and (2) the weakening of a “stabiliser” muscle.

  • So-called mobiliser muscles are those that produce movement; they are often big muscle groups with more fast-twitch fibres. Although they produce high power, these muscles have a tendency to shorten. The hamstrings and rectus femoris (one of the quadracep muscles) are the two main mobiliser muscles around the hip joint.
  • By contrast, stabiliser muscles control movement or joint position, often working against gravity. They are smaller, deeper muscles which often have more slow-twitch fibres. They should be well coordinated and have good endurance capacity, though they have a tendency to be under-active and weak. The gluteals are the key stabiliser muscles around the hip joint.

In this section of Hip and Groin Injuries: prevention and treatment we examine the problems that can occur when mobiliser muscles tighten, and/or stabiliser muscles weaken. We examine two sports injury case studies in some detail. Both of them are excellent illustrations of of how performing muscle imbalance tests can help you to devise an appropriate rehabilitation programme for athletes with back and hamstring trouble.

The main advantage of this approach is that the rehab muscle training is specific to the function required of that muscle, e.g. a stabilising muscle is trained with static and slow controlled exercises emphasising endurance, which is exactly how this muscle would work in daily life and exercise.

The discussion includes ten exercises you can use in treatment and rehabilitation work, complete with illustrations.

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Groin Pain I: how do you self-treat the troublesome psoas muscle hip flexor?

The next section of Hip and Groin Injuries: prevention and treatment pays special attention to groin injury – a common injury area as we know.

First we home in on the often-overlooked psoas muscle – neglected because it lies so deep below the surface of the skin, and therefore is hard to locate. Unlike other deep lying muscles, like the piriformis, stretching the psoas and trying to locate the psoas with your fingers is not easy. When you look at where it lies in relation to the pelvis and the role it has to play, you’ll understand that in both hip, groin and lower back injuries quality and feel of the psoas is paramount.

So the discussion focuses on techniques for effective self-treatment of this troublesome hip flexor. We give you full details of a innovative way for athletes to effectively locate and treat this troublesome muscle… using a broomstick. Yes, a broomstick! No black cat required, though…

For athletes looking to self-treat such injuries, arguably this section alone is well worth reading the report.

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Groin Pain II: do you know the right way to deal with acetabular labrum tears?

Acetabular labrum tears are a common cause of time away from sport in athletes with groin injury. (The acetabular labrum is a ring of fibrocartilage that attaches to the circular outer edge of the hip socket or acetabulum).

Other causes of groin pain include adductor strains, inguinal and femoral hernias, nerve entrapment, stress fractures of the femoral neck, avulsion fractures of the pelvis, osteitis pubis, intra-abdominal disorders and referred back pain.

First described in 1957, it is only in the last 15 years, with advances in imaging and hip arthroscopy, that acetabular labrum lesions have been recognised as a common cause of groin pain in athletes.

So in Hip and Groin Injuries: prevention and treatment we deal with this relatively unrecognised cause of groin injury, first setting out both symptoms and diagnosis, before dealing with techniques of treatment. It’s a fascinating discussion for athletes and care professionals alike.

The section includes a detailed case study concerned with a leading teenage Rugby Union player whose occasional groin pain develops into a more serious condition that eventually brings him constant pain on any and every movement of his hip. Diagnosis of his condition is followed by full details of a 3-way treatment program that results in successful rehabilitation.

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Of all the soft-tissue injuries an athlete can suffer, groin injuries are potentially the most debilitating and frustrating of all – especially in terms of time lost from competition and return to full competitive fitness.

The co-existence of multiple issues is the most plausible explanation for this observed difficulty in management. Indeed, it is common for athletes to shop around seeking different medical opinions for their ongoing groin pain, and to receive varying medical suggestions as to where the problem originates.

It is important to remember that groin problems often have more than one possible cause existing. Groin injuries are notorious for ‘co-existing pathologies’.

However, the ‘big three’ when considering ongoing chronic groin pain are:

  • adductor tendinopathy (disease of the tendon, either inflammation or damage to a tendon)
  • osteitis pubis (injury to the cartilaginous joint of the pubic symphysis), and
  • inguinal (sportsman’s) hernia

It is not uncommon to see two or even all three of these conditions co-existing at the same time. However, there still exists a myriad of other conditions that may be affecting the groin area.

So the last part of the special groin injury focus of Hip and Groin Injuries: prevention and treatment looks in detail at two groin injury case studies. In it, we discuss the relevant anatomy and principal injury mechanisms. Then we explain the best way to test for strength and inhibition of the adductor muscles.

In the section on treatment, we divide the discussion into 5 treatment areas: from stretching, to strength retraining to rehab running. The emphasis throughout is very much on practical techniques and exercises for athletes and care professionals alike.

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Rehabilitating the Gluteus Medius: a new perspective on an established topic

You may wonder whether there is anything new that can be said about the gluteus medius muscle – so read on and prepare to be surprised.

Because the simple fact is that the basic function of the gluteus medius has not been truly appreciated in the sports medicine literature. It’s an oversight we address in the next section of Hip and Groin Injuries: prevention and treatment.

Gluteus medius plays an important role as a strong hip abductor and the major stabiliser of the pelvis on the weight-bearing femur during stance phase of gait. It prevents the hip on the opposite side from ‘dipping’ during single-leg stance (otherwise known to sports medicine professionals as a positive ‘Trendelenburg sign’).

However, this small but valuable muscle has a more extensive role to play, and understanding the intricacies and how to get the most out of it, should therefore be a priority of every coach and their athlete.

So in Hip and Groin Injuries: prevention and treatment we reassess the true functions of the gluteus medius, identifying as we go the two best ways to test the muscle’s functionality in athletes. The discussion includes a handy, 1-page prompt sheet for use during the tests.

Then we turn to the issue of rehabilitation.

While there is no shortage of source materials to find exercises for retraining gluteus medius function, some exercises (such as isolated hip abduction in side lying) completely disregard the all-important function outlined above, of hip joint approximation/closure and pelvic stabilisation and rotation.

So we highlight three exercises with the following distinguishing features:

  • they are performed in weight-bearing or simulated weight-bearing
  • they are performed in neutral hip position or positions of slight hip extension (most glute med exercises are done in positions of hip flexion, which tends to preferentially recruit the TFL in a hip abduction or hip stabilisation role).

The section concludes with an extensive listing of exercises for the effective strengthening and treatment of the gluteal muscles. Several illustrations are included as well, so there’s no confusion over the right way to perform each exercise.

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Prevention: it’s always so much better than cure

The closing section of Hip and Groin Injuries: prevention and treatment is one of the shortest – but arguably it’s one of the most important.

Because it focuses on the best ways to avoid groin and hip injuries.

Specifically this section identifies, lists and describes the most effective exercises for conditioning the muscles of the human body so as to prevent these all-too-common sports injuries. While we accept that no amount of sports conditioning can guarantee a season free from injury, we also know that non-contact injuries in sport are, sadly, far more common than they need be.

Each exercise is accompanied by all the necessary diagrams, making them easy to follow for athletes, coaches and sports care professionals alike.

So keep your copy of Hip and Groin Injuries: prevention and treatment handy, and there’s no reason why you, or your athletes, should have to suffer hip or groin injury ever again!

Details of your special, discount offer

As a registered member of our Peak Performance web site, you qualify for a copy of Hip and Groin Injuries: prevention and treatment at a special 42% discount. Place your order today and you pay just $34.99 (£21.69) (£22) instead of the full price of $59.99 (£38).

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Hip and Groin Injuries: prevention and treatment is one of a series of special reports from Peak Performance, the sports science newsletter. This practical work book is not available elsewhere.

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